psychoactivelectricity:

Willian Baziotes (1912-1963) / figure wih arrows 1936-39

psychoactivelectricity:

Willian Baziotes (1912-1963) / figure wih arrows 1936-39

Larry Marder 
iPad doodle

Larry Marder
iPad doodle

dandyads:

Band-Aid Sheer Strips, 1958

dandyads:

Band-Aid Sheer Strips, 1958

(via nievird)

Larry Marder iPad doodle

Larry Marder iPad doodle

Larry Marder iPad drawing

Larry Marder iPad drawing

massarrah:

Old Babylonian “Year Names” for Hammurabi and His Successor
This tablet records a list of year names in Akkadian for two Old Babylonian rulers, Hammurabi (1792-1750 BCE) and his successor, Samsuiluna (1749-1712 BCE). In Mesopotamia, year names offered one way of dating whereby each year within a king’s reign would be described by an event, such as a victory or the construction of a temple (e.g., “Year in which Hammurabi built for Nanna his temple in Babylon”). Other methods of dating included numbering the years within a reign or naming the year after an official. Such methods have provided modern scholars with important tools for reconstructing chronologies in the Ancient Near East. (Source 1, 2)
Old Babylonian, c. 2000-1600 BCE.
British Museum.

massarrah:

Old Babylonian “Year Names” for Hammurabi and His Successor

This tablet records a list of year names in Akkadian for two Old Babylonian rulers, Hammurabi (1792-1750 BCE) and his successor, Samsuiluna (1749-1712 BCE). In Mesopotamia, year names offered one way of dating whereby each year within a king’s reign would be described by an event, such as a victory or the construction of a temple (e.g., “Year in which Hammurabi built for Nanna his temple in Babylon”). Other methods of dating included numbering the years within a reign or naming the year after an official. Such methods have provided modern scholars with important tools for reconstructing chronologies in the Ancient Near East. (Source 1, 2)

Old Babylonian, c. 2000-1600 BCE.

British Museum.

(via sigilmancy)

archaicwonder:

Elamite Dog Amulet of the goddess Gula, Circa 3rd Millennium BC
In ancient Elam, the significance of the dog was related to the goddess Gula, since they were her sacred animals. As the goddess of healing and patroness of doctors, these gold amuletic dogs may have been thought to have healing powers. Gula’s principle shrine was at the é-u-gi7-ra (“Dog Temple”) at Isin, but she also had temples at Nippur, Borsippa, and Assur. Particularly notable in Isin are more than 30 dog burials discovered below the ramp leading to the temple. 
Elam was an ancient civilization centered in the far west and southwest of modern-day Iran, stretching from the lowlands of what is now Khuzestan and Ilam Province, as well as a small part of southern Iraq. In classical literature, Elam was more often referred to as Susiana, a name derived from its capital, Susa.

archaicwonder:

Elamite Dog Amulet of the goddess Gula, Circa 3rd Millennium BC

In ancient Elam, the significance of the dog was related to the goddess Gula, since they were her sacred animals. As the goddess of healing and patroness of doctors, these gold amuletic dogs may have been thought to have healing powers. Gula’s principle shrine was at the é-u-gi7-ra (“Dog Temple”) at Isin, but she also had temples at Nippur, Borsippa, and Assur. Particularly notable in Isin are more than 30 dog burials discovered below the ramp leading to the temple. 

Elam was an ancient civilization centered in the far west and southwest of modern-day Iran, stretching from the lowlands of what is now Khuzestan and Ilam Province, as well as a small part of southern Iraq. In classical literature, Elam was more often referred to as Susiana, a name derived from its capital, Susa.

(via mudwerks)

arsarteetlabore:

Cyril Power, Vortex, 1929

arsarteetlabore:

Cyril Power, Vortex, 1929

(via pale-ring)

moldypages:

Life 2-19-1945

moldypages:

Life 2-19-1945

(via klappersacks)